The Eye @ Wordpress.com

Miss Me Yet?

Posted in Uncategorized by eyebee on September 24, 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

Posted via email from Eyebeemania

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Tweety Bird is 60!

Posted in Uncategorized by eyebee on September 23, 2009


" I TAWT I TAW A  PU………..A PUT……..OH I DON'T KNOW WAT DA SHIT I TAW!!"

 

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Rare Beer Tuesday, Special Events and New Arrivals at CBX

Posted in Uncategorized by eyebee on September 22, 2009

Some very exciting updates this week from The Charleston Beer Exchange:

Rare Beer Tuesday (9/22)
As we do every Tuesday at 5pm, we'll be tapping something extra special on the growler station!  Our "Rare Beer Tuesday" growler feature this week will be Great Divide Chocolate Oak Aged Yeti Imperial Stout!  Check out this description from the brewery: "We toned down the hops a bit to allow cocoa nibs to contribute some pleasing bitterness, while vanilla notes from the oak combine with the cocoa to create an aroma and flavor akin to a gourmet chocolate bar. A dash of cayenne keeps things lively, adding just a bit of heat to the finish. A Yeti for summer? Hell yes."  This one is sure to be a hit so don't procrastinate!

New Bottles
Allagash Victor
Allagash Victoria
Weihenstephaner Oktoberfest
St. Louis Gueuze Fond Tradition

Click Here to See What's On the Growler Station Now

Beer Tasting at J. Paulz (9/22)

If you didn't make it last time, J. Paul'z will be hosting another beer tasting event on Tuesday from 5:30 to 7:30pm.  Sample four excellent beers paired with appetizers for $15.  See their website for more information:  jpaulz.com

Carolina's Beer Dinner with New Holland Brewing (9/30)

Please join us at Carolina's on Wednesday, September 30th for a special beer dinner with New Holland Brewing!  Chef Bacon's five course menu paired with beers from New Holland is sure to be outstanding.  Reservations are required.  For the menu and more information, please see here: Carolinasrestaurant.com.

Ted's Butcherblock "Porktoberfest" Celebration (10/10)
Mark you calendars, October 10th will be the Ted's Butcherblock 4 year anniversary party!  Live music, great food and beer, prizes and even a bacon cook-off (yes, you can enter!).  Don't miss it!  See the Ted's website for more information:  Tedsbutcherblock.com.

Please follow us on Twitter or Facebook for up the the minute updates and news!

The Charleston Beer Exchange
14 Exchange St.
Charleston, SC 29401
843.577.5446
www.thecharlestonbeerexchange.com

Posted via email from Boozemania

Rare Beer Tuesday, Special Events and New Arrivals at CBX

Posted in Uncategorized by eyebee on September 22, 2009

Some very exciting updates this week from The Charleston Beer Exchange:

Rare Beer Tuesday (9/22)
As we do every Tuesday at 5pm, we'll be tapping something extra special on the growler station!  Our "Rare Beer Tuesday" growler feature this week will be Great Divide Chocolate Oak Aged Yeti Imperial Stout!  Check out this description from the brewery: "We toned down the hops a bit to allow cocoa nibs to contribute some pleasing bitterness, while vanilla notes from the oak combine with the cocoa to create an aroma and flavor akin to a gourmet chocolate bar. A dash of cayenne keeps things lively, adding just a bit of heat to the finish. A Yeti for summer? Hell yes."  This one is sure to be a hit so don't procrastinate!

New Bottles
Allagash Victor
Allagash Victoria
Weihenstephaner Oktoberfest
St. Louis Gueuze Fond Tradition

Click Here to See What's On the Growler Station Now

Beer Tasting at J. Paulz (9/22)

If you didn't make it last time, J. Paul'z will be hosting another beer tasting event on Tuesday from 5:30 to 7:30pm.  Sample four excellent beers paired with appetizers for $15.  See their website for more information:  jpaulz.com

Carolina's Beer Dinner with New Holland Brewing (9/30)

Please join us at Carolina's on Wednesday, September 30th for a special beer dinner with New Holland Brewing!  Chef Bacon's five course menu paired with beers from New Holland is sure to be outstanding.  Reservations are required.  For the menu and more information, please see here: Carolinasrestaurant.com.

Ted's Butcherblock "Porktoberfest" Celebration (10/10)
Mark you calendars, October 10th will be the Ted's Butcherblock 4 year anniversary party!  Live music, great food and beer, prizes and even a bacon cook-off (yes, you can enter!).  Don't miss it!  See the Ted's website for more information:  Tedsbutcherblock.com.

Please follow us on Twitter or Facebook for up the the minute updates and news!

The Charleston Beer Exchange
14 Exchange St.
Charleston, SC 29401
843.577.5446
www.thecharlestonbeerexchange.com

Posted via email from Eyebeemania

Now You Lay Me Down To Sleep

Posted in Uncategorized by eyebee on September 20, 2009

Now You Lay Me Down To Sleep

Posted in Uncategorized by eyebee on September 20, 2009

  
  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 


 


Posted via email from Eyebeemania

Taking the Piss

Posted in Uncategorized by eyebee on September 19, 2009

Britain and America have been described as two countries separated by a common language.

That statement sums it up pretty well I think.

We each use different words when talking about the same things; “Trash” in the US is “Rubbish” in the UK.

To complicate things further a “Trash Can” in America, is a “Dustbin” in Britain.

The problem has been over the years that Americans keep changing things to suit their own ends. Football is called Soccer, to avoid confusion with the game where, out of the whole team, only one player actually kicks the ball with his foot.

They bring this player on the field only when the ball needs to be kicked, because he is the only one who knows how to do it.

Where they don’t change the word, they spell it differently. In America they took the “U” out of colour and spell it color, which is fine, it simplifies things.

However, when Americans come across a name like mine, “Moulton,” they don’t know the rule is; when these two vowels are together, the second one is silent.

They try to put the “U” in there and it comes out sounding something like Mow-ull-ton, instead of Mol-ton. I have to explain, it is like when sheep make love; the ewe (U) is silent.

Here is a joke that no American will get.

What’s the difference between a Kangaroo, and a Kangaroot? A Kangaroo is an animal, and a Kangaroot is a Geordie stuck in a lift.

To translate for those used to American English. From the end of the punch line; a lift is an elevator, a Geordie is a native of Newcastle, which is a town in the far North of England. They speak in a dialect that even most English people can’t understand.

In fact if it wasn’t for Newcastle Brown Ale, most Americans would not have heard of the place. So a person from Newcastle, trapped in an elevator, would make the statement, “I can’t get out.” However, with this strange dialect they speak there, it would sound like “A Kangaroot.”

Of course jokes are never funny when you have to explain them, but it does serve to illustrate the many different dialects that exist within the tiny island made up of England, Scotland and Wales.

I grew up in the East End of London so developed a strong Cockney accent early on. As a teen my parents moved to Luton, which is only 30 miles North of London, so the dialect didn’t change that much. Locals from Luton, leave the “T” out of the name of their town, and call it Lu’on.

In my early twenties I moved back to the East End of London, so my accent was pretty well established; even though I moved to the North of England in the 1960s, and to Worcester in the West in the 1970s. 

When I came to the United States in 1979, I may as well have spoken a foreign language. I had no problem understanding Americans, but they could not understand me.

I remember walking into a Produce Market in New Jersey and asking for Grapefruit; I was met with blank stares. In frustration I walked over to a pile of grapefruit, and holding one up asked, “Was’sat then?”

“Grapefruit,” they answered.

“Wot the faack did I just say?” I responded. Luckily, they didn’t understand that either. I bought my grapefruit and left.

There followed years of frustration until I adapted my version of the English so it could be understood. Now the Cockney dialect, bastardised with American, people think I’m Australian.

The problem is most Americans think that the English all talk like the Monty Python crew. When they realize I am English they say something like, “Pip, pip old chap, absolutely spiffing, jolly good, what.” 

They think it is funny, but after thiry years it is bloody annoying, ‘cos no one in England actually speaks like that. Which lead me to the realization that in America there is no slang for “Taking the Piss.” Which is exactly what they are doing with the mock accent.

To explain once more to my US readers, the Daily Show with Jon Stewart on Comedy Central, is “Taking the Piss” out of the American News Media. There is no slang expression for that in America; it is not the same as “Are you kidding?” or “Are you shittin’ me?” There is a subtle difference.

John Cleese and the rest of the Monty Python cast were taking the piss out of the British upper class twit, by exaggerating the upper class accent.

The thing is in England, Piss Taking is an art form, and you don’t always realize it is happening. When you do you ask, “Are you taking the piss?”

Every one laughs, and the piss taking stops. Without the “Piss Taking” expression in America the piss taking continues.

Sometimes amongst strangers I can go with the pretence that I’m Australian. Americans think all Australians are like Crocodile Dundee (Paul Hogan.) or Russell Crow, and it’s best not to take the piss out of those people.

Other than that, all I can do is endure it and occasionally write piss taking articles like this one.
 

This is hilarious, and so true!

Posted via web from Eyebeemania

BBC Archive: Tomorrow’s World

Posted in Uncategorized by eyebee on September 19, 2009

Editor’s note: As the BBC Archive website releases selections from the iconic BBC science show Tomorrow’s World, former presenter Maggie Philbin shares her memories of the programme. (PM)

Raymond Baxter Tomorrow's World presenter during rehearsalI was ten when Tomorrow’s World began in 1965. I remember watching Raymond Baxter (pictured) in flickering black and white, telling me everything the future would hold. He carried me through the first flight of Concorde, the first ATM, and the early years of space flight. And there’s a rich choice of ‘firsts’ in BBC Archive’s collection of Tomorrow’s World released today – Europe’s first home computer terminal, the first “mobile” phone, and the first computerised credit card machine are all there.

Tomorrow’s World’s first show, from 1965, opens with a story about a committee who had to choose which patients would get the gift of survival on “life-saving kidney machines”. From the start, Tomorrow’s World was a show determined to go beyond “what’s happening” in technology and also ask ethical questions.

Of course, the early shows are also very much of their time. Throwaway references to, for example, secretaries who spend all day filing their nails, were common. But by the time I turned up in 1982, not only was Judith Hann firmly in place but so were some outstanding female producers and researchers. And the editors were scrupulous: references to surgeons, engineers or mechanics as “he” came to an end. If a film involved dropping from a helicopter, driving a juggernaut, or testing a one-person submarine, then that item would have Judith’s or my name against it. It’s very touching to meet women who insist that watching us handle technology with confidence was the reason they chose careers in that area themselves.

Tomorrow’s World is the best programme I have ever worked on. But it was also the most frightening. I still can’t hear the opening music without my stomach churning. I was lucky enough to demonstrate the first fax machine, digital camera, sat nav and the first supermarket barcode reader. Cutting edge technology, for sure, but it came at a price. Frequently, the inventions were fragile and temperamental prototypes. The show was live and they had one chance to prove themselves. Typically, they would work perfectly all morning, then begin to play up during the afternoon rehearsals, introducing an unwelcome element of tension. Just before transmission, the angst-ridden inventors were swept off the studio floor and herded to the other side of TV Centre, to eliminate the possibility of them running onto the studio floor during the live programme in an attempt to rescue years of research from catastrophic failure.

So watch and relish the clip with Kieran Prendiville and “Hissing Sid”, the robot “guaranteed” to pot the black on a snooker table. But spare a thought for the poor inventor watching the item through his fingers from the hospitality area.

Tomorrow’s World was a show that forged powerful professional and personal friendships. Not only with Judith, Kieran, Howard and Peter but with the people who insisted on that final shot in a dark, wet potato field, or that it was perfectly safe to fly in a metal cage suspended from a helicopter or who had the imagination to see an elegant visual analogy for a complicated story.

At the Friday meeting every item would be discussed in detail. Judith and I would sit at our desks, surreptitiously opening our mail. In the middle of one particularly tense discussion, I passed her a letter I’d received, which I now have framed in my downstairs loo:

Dear Maggie

I hope you are well and happy. I hope Keith is happy too. Peter and me like watching “Tomorrow’s World”. Peter is my cat. He is very interested in the future.

Love Simone

It’s fabulous that these pieces from the BBC Archive are now available online. And I hope the future we predicted matched Peter’s expectations.

A new BBC Four season, Electric Revolution, which charts the rise of consumer technology over the last fifty years, begins later this month.

I really enjoyed this show.

Posted via web from Eyebeemania

You Are What You Eat

Posted in Uncategorized by eyebee on September 19, 2009

This woman obviously eats too much garlic…

 


 
 
                                        

 

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Charleston Beer Exchange News

Posted in Uncategorized by eyebee on September 18, 2009